Connecting the dots between genetics and disease in SCA13

Written by Dr. David D. Bushart  Edited by Dr. Carolyn J. Adamski

How one research group worked to identify previously unknown causes of SCA13, and what we can learn from their strategy.

With so many different causes of cerebellar ataxia, how are doctors able to make an accurate diagnosis? This is an extremely important question for doctors, research communities, and patients. For doctors, knowing the underlying genetic cause for a case of ataxia is critical not only for formulating a more specific treatment plan, but also for performing informed genetic screens to determine if a patient’s family members are at risk for developing ataxia. For researchers, knowing what causes a certain type of ataxia allows for the development of new treatment strategies. And for patients, an accurate diagnosis can, importantly, provide peace-of-mind.

Unfortunately, getting to this point of diagnosis can still be a difficult task in a lot of cases – up to 20 percent of ataxia cases do not have a confirmed genetic cause (Hadjivassiliou et al., Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 2016). This is clearly an area for improvement in the field of ataxia research. Fortunately, many research groups are making efforts to improve our knowledge of the many different causes for cerebellar ataxia, how frequently they appear, and how we might be able to better treat them.

two puzzle pieces being connected together by hands
Two puzzle pieces being connected together, much like how researchers connect pieces of data together to understand disease. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Though there are many studies that are continuously being performed and are constantly improving our knowledge of the specific causes of cerebellar ataxia, this summary will focus on the work of one group (Figueroa et al., PLoS One 2011). The research team, led by Dr. Stefan Pulst at the University of Utah, sought to better identify the frequency of different genetic mutations causing SCA13, a rare, dominantly-inherited form of spinocerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in a gene called KCNC3.

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The Discovery of SCA8

Written by Dr. Hannah K Shorrock Edited by Dr. Judit M Perez Ortiz

How one team uncovered the first SCA known to be caused by a CTG repeat expansion mutation

Identifying the gene that causes a type of ataxia not only gives patients and their families a clearer diagnosis and prognosis, but also allows scientists to model the disease. Through genetic animal models of ataxia, researchers can study how a single mutation causes a disease and how we can try to slow, halt, or even reverse this process. It is this path through research that may eventually lead from gene discovery to the development of effective therapies.

The gene that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 8 (SCA8) was first described in a research article published in 1999. Since then, many research articles on SCA8 have been published, including research into the DNA repeat expansions that cause the ataxia, the cellular processes that lead to ataxia, and the development of multiple animal models of SCA8. Together, these move the scientific community further along the road of research.

mother with her two children looking at a mountain
Image of mother with her children. SCA8 was initially identified in a mother and daughter. SCA8 also shows maternal penetrance bias. Photo by Josh Willink on Pexels.com

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