The Discovery of SCA8

Written by Dr. Hannah K Shorrock Edited by Dr. Judit M Perez Ortiz

How one team uncovered the first SCA known to be caused by a CTG repeat expansion mutation

Identifying the gene that causes a type of ataxia not only gives patients and their families a clearer diagnosis and prognosis, but also allows scientists to model the disease. Through genetic animal models of ataxia, researchers can study how a single mutation causes a disease and how we can try to slow, halt, or even reverse this process. It is this path through research that may eventually lead from gene discovery to the development of effective therapies.

The gene that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 8 (SCA8) was first described in a research article published in 1999. Since then, many research articles on SCA8 have been published, including research into the DNA repeat expansions that cause the ataxia, the cellular processes that lead to ataxia, and the development of multiple animal models of SCA8. Together, these move the scientific community further along the road of research.

mother with her two children looking at a mountain
Image of mother with her children. SCA8 was initially identified in a mother and daughter. SCA8 also shows maternal penetrance bias. Photo by Josh Willink on Pexels.com

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