Stressed to the limit: Uncovering a role for oxidative stress in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7

Written by Siddharth Nath Edited by Dr. Ray Truant

Oxidative stress is a hot topic in neurodegenerative disease research. New findings from Dr. Jonathan Magaña’s lab in Mexico show increases in measures of damage from oxygen compounds in SCA7 patients versus healthy individuals. This suggests that this type of chemical stress may be a critical step in triggering the death of brain cells in SCA7.

You’re stressed – whether you like it or not

You may not realize it, but all of the cells in your body are, at some point or another, undergoing stress. Now, this isn’t the same as what we normally take the word “stress” to mean. Your cells aren’t cramming for an exam, nor are they worried about an upcoming job interview. Instead, stress at the cellular level refers to the challenges cells face in the form of environmental extremes (like temperature changes), mechanical damage, exposure to toxins, and dysregulation of stress responses.

A particularly nasty type of stress that cells must contend with is oxidative stress. This results from an imbalance in the levels of reactive oxygen species (hence the term ‘oxidative’) within a cell and the cell’s ability to clear away these species. Reactive oxygen species form inside of cells as a byproduct of normal metabolism, and every cell has mechanisms to help with their clearance. These mechanisms, however, can become impaired. This could end up being disastrous because, when not removed properly, reactive oxygen species can wreak havoc in the cell: they have the ability to directly damage every cellular component, including proteins, lipids, and DNA.

red pencil writing the word stress
Photo by Pedro Figueras on Pexels.com

Interestingly, oxidative stress increases naturally as we age and is a normal part of growing older. Oxidative stress is a topic of intense study and has been implicated in everything from cancer and bone disease to other neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease). An inability to cope with or respond to increases in oxidative stress associated with aging may explain why many neurodegenerative disorders occur later in life, despite the fact that affected individuals express the disease gene from birth.

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