Spotlight: The Kuo Lab

Principal Investigator: Dr. Sheng-Han Kuo

Location: Columbia University, New York, NY, United States

Year Founded:  2012

What disease areas do you research?

What models and techniques do you use?

Kuo Lab group photo.
This is a group picture of the Kuo Lab. From the left to right: Nadia Amokrane, Chi-Ying (Roy) Lin, Sara Radmard, Sheng-Han Kuo (PI), Chih-Chun (Charles) Lin, Odane Liu, Chun-Lun Ni , Meng-Ling Chen, Natasha Desai, David Ruff.

Research Focus

What is your research about?

We study how mishaps and damage in the cerebellum lead to the symptoms experienced by ataxia and tremor patients. By looking at human brains, as well as brains from mouse models, we study how different changes in brain structure can lead to symptoms. This includes how well different parts of the brain can communicate with each other.

Why do you do this research?

When you ask patients about the challenges living with ataxia or tremor, they will talk to you about their symptoms. Symptoms can make different activities of daily living very challenging! By connecting specific brain changes to specific symptoms, we want to develop treatment options that target specific diseases. By doing this, we hope to improve patient’s quality of life. 

Initiative for Columbia Ataxia and Tremor Logo. It is a circle containing a lion with its whiskers to look like a neuron

The Kuo lab is part of the Initiative for Columbia Ataxia and Tremor. It’s a new Initiative at Columbia University to bring a group of physicians, scientists, surgeons, and engineers to advance the knowledge of the cerebellum and to develop effective therapies for ataxia and tremor.

Are you recruiting human participants for research?

Yes, we are! We are looking for participants for clinical research and trials. You can learn more about the studies we are currently recruiting for at this link.

Fun Fact

In the Kuo Lab, we call ourselves “the Protector of the Cerebellum in New York City”.

For More Information, check out the Kuo Lab Website!

We are looking for new graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to join our team. If you are interested in our work, please reach out to us


Written by Dr. Sheng-Han Kuo, Edited by Celeste Suart

Spotlight: The Zoghbi Lab

Baylor College of Medicine

Principal Investigator: Dr. Huda Zoghbi

Location: Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

Year Founded:  1988

Logo: Texas Children's Hospital. Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute

What models and techniques do you use?

Research Focus

What is your research about?

Our laboratory uses multiple methods to explore the underlying causes of different neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. Some diseases we study affect children, like Rett Syndrome. Others affect adults, like spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We also research how healthy brains grow and develop.

We first seek to understand the mechanism by which a mutant protein causes disease, allowing us to more thoughtfully and effectively develop therapeutic options for the diseases we study. Our work in SCA1 demonstrated that lowering levels of the disease-driving protein is beneficial in the course of disease, informing our approach to the study of other diseases of the brain.  

Why do you do this research?

We do this research to help the patients, families and caregivers affected by the diseases we study. Most of the disorders we study currently have no or very few treatment options available, and we hope to help in changing that.

Our lab began with Dr. Zoghbi seeing patients in the clinic who were diagnosed with Rett Syndrome and SCA1. Work with these patients allowed for the discovery of the genes causing these diseases. Today, we hope to aid in understanding how these diseases work and to develop therapies that can then be brought back to the clinic for patients. Furthermore, we hope our findings and the tools we’ve developed will aid in the study of other neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders.

A group picture of the Zoghbi Lab
Zoghbi Lab members at Hermann Park in Houston, TX in 2021. Bottom row L-R: Y. Sun, W. Wang, W. Lee, M. Zaghlula, H. Lee, S. Coffin, S. Wu, J. Butts, C. Adamski, H. Zoghbi (PI), Y. Shao, J. Johnson, J. Zhou, A. Tewari, H. Palikarana Tirumala, J. Lopez, Top row L-R: A. Anderson, E. Xhako, E. Villavicencio, Y. Li, S. Bajikar, M. Durham.

Fun Fact

On April 8, 1993, both Dr. Huda Zoghbi and Dr. Harry Orr identified the gene, ATXN1, which when mutated, is responsible for causing SCA1. You can read about this discovery here.

For More Information, check out the Zoghbi Lab website!


Written by Stephanie Coffin, Edited by Celeste Suart

Snapshot: What is Neurogenesis?

Neurons are the cells that serve as building blocks of the nervous system. The brain contains an enormous variety of neurons, and they all need to get a start somewhere. The process by which neurons are formed is called neurogenesis.

An artist’s drawing of neurons in the brain. Photo used under license by Andrii Vodolazhskyi/Shutterstock.com.

When does neurogenesis happen?

Nearly all neurogenesis occurs before the age of 2 when the brain is in the early stages of being formed and refined. While most cells in the body are replaced as they wear out or get injured, neurons in the brain do not. By young adulthood, the brain has largely stopped making new neurons. Other than serving as an excellent reason to wear a helmet and otherwise protect your head from injury, this lack of new neuron formation doesn’t have a noticeable effect on how we go about our daily lives. After all, neurons are an incredibly adaptable cell type that readily change in response to a person’s environment and experiences.

In the past few decades, we have learned that there is an exception to the “all neurons are born early in life” rule. Some research has shown that new neurons can, in fact, be formed during adulthood in specific brain areas. For example, the hippocampus, a brain structure important for its role in forming and maintaining memories, continues to create neurons over the course of one’s life.

The purpose of these newly generated neurons is still debated. However, numerous studies have shown that neuron formation in the hippocampus is reduced in instances of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This includes certain types of ataxia like SCA1. This is thought to contribute to changes in cognitive function and mood, though the exact mechanisms are still being determined.

Why is neurogenesis interesting for the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), aren’t these neurodegenerative disorders?

Since the discovery of neurodegenerative disorders, most research has focused on symptoms and how to delay symptom onset. This view sees neurodegenerative disorders, like the SCAs, as outcomes of mid to late-life when the toxic effects of mutant proteins become suddenly rampant. However, these disorders are caused by proteins that are present from the very earliest stages of brain formation.

In 2018, researchers studying SCA1 found that neurogenesis is increased in the cerebellum of young mice. This changed how the cerebellum communicates with the rest of the brain. This suggests that cerebellar function can be affected by more than neuronal loss. It could be of wider interest in the SCAs given the cerebellar dysfunction that is common between them. No research on cerebellar neurogenesis has been performed in other SCAs by this point. However, there are some indications that neurogenesis may also be altered in SCA2.

Additionally, Huntington’s Disease, a polyglutamine repeat disorder in the same disease family as several SCAs, has been shown to have increased neurogenesis in the cortex in both young mice and prenatal babies. The combination of these recent studies has made early neuron formation an area of key interest in the study of neurodegenerative disorders.

Current theories in the field contend that while the brain can compensate for changes in neuron numbers in early life, altered neurogenesis could be creating unique brain circuitry in individuals with known disorder-causing protein mutations. These changes could make them more vulnerable to neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration later in life.

Evidence for changed neurogenesis in SCAs, both early and late in life, adds a new layer of consideration to what we broadly think of as a mid- to late-life neurodegenerative disease. Additional research in coming years will hopefully provide more insight into how these additional facets of neural health may inform the development of new therapies.

If you would like to learn more about neurogenesis, take a look at these resources by the Queensland Brain Insitute and News-Medical.

Snapshot written by Carrie Sheeler and edited by Dr. Chloe Soutar.

Additional References

Cvetanovic M, Hu YS, Opal P. Mutant Ataxin-1 Inhibits Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation in SCA1. Cerebellum. 2017 Apr;16(2):340-347. doi: 10.1007/s12311-016-0794-9. PMID: 27306906; PMCID: PMC5510931.

Shukla JP, Deshpande G, Shashidhara LS. Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 is a context-specific positive regulator of Notch signaling during neurogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Development. 2017 Mar 1;144(5):905-915. doi: 10.1242/dev.140657. Epub 2017 Feb 7. PMID: 28174239; PMCID: PMC5374347.

Xia G, Santostefano K, Hamazaki T, Liu J, Subramony SH, Terada N, Ashizawa T. Generation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 in vitro. J Mol Neurosci. 2013 Oct;51(2):237-48. doi: 10.1007/s12031-012-9930-2. Epub 2012 Dec 9. PMID: 23224816; PMCID: PMC3608734.

Barnat M, Capizzi M, Aparicio E, Boluda S, Wennagel D, Kacher R, Kassem R, Lenoir S, Agasse F, Braz BY, Liu JP, Ighil J, Tessier A, Zeitlin SO, Duyckaerts C, Dommergues M, Durr A, Humbert S. Huntington’s disease alters human neurodevelopment. Science. 2020 Aug 14;369(6505):787-793. doi: 10.1126/science.aax3338. Epub 2020 Jul 16. PMID: 32675289; PMCID: PMC7859879.

Regulating ataxin-1 expression as a therapeutic avenue for SCA1

Written by Dr. Hannah Shorrock   Edited by Dr. Hayley McLoughlin

Nitschke and colleagues identify a microRNA that regulates ataxin-1 levels and rescues motor deficits in a mouse model of SCA1

What if you could use systems already in place in the cell to regulate levels of toxic proteins in disease? This is the approach that Nitschke and colleagues took to identify the cellular pathways that regulate ataxin-1 levels. Through this strategy, the group found a microRNA, a small single-stranded RNA, called miR760, that regulates levels of ataxin-1 by directly binding to its mRNA and inhibiting expression. By increasing levels of miR760 in a mouse model of SCA1, ataxin-1 protein levels decreased and motor function improved. This approach has the potential to identify possible therapies for SCA1. It may also help identify disease-causing mutations in ataxia patients with unknown genetic causes.

Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a loss of coordination and balance. SCA1 is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN1 gene. This results in the ataxin-1 protein containing an expanded polyglutamine tract. With the expanded polyglutamine tract, ataxin-1 is toxic to cells in the brain and leads to dysfunction and death of neurons in the cerebellum and brainstem.

As with all protein-coding genes, surrounding the protein coding region of ATXN1 gene are the 5’ (before the coding sequence) and 3’ (after the coding sequence) untranslated regions (UTRs). These regions are not translated into the final ataxin-1 protein product but are important for the regulation of this process. Important regulation factors called enhancers and repressors of translation located in 5’ and 3’ UTRs. ATXN1 has a long 5’ UTR. Genes that require fine regulation, such as growth factors, are often found to have long 5’ UTRs: the longer a 5’ UTR, the more opportunity for regulation of gene expression. The group, therefore, tested the hypothesis that the 5’ UTR is involved in regulating the expression of ataxin-1.

In their initial studies, Nitschke and colleagues identified that the ATXN1 5’UTR is capable of reducing both protein and RNA levels when placed in front of (5’ to) a reporter coding sequence. One common mechanism through which this regulation of gene expression could be occurring is the binding of microRNAs, or miRNAs, to the ATXN1 5’UTR. miRNAs are short single-stranded RNAs that form base pairs with a specific sequence to which the miRNA has a complementary sequence; this leads to regulation of expression of the mRNA to which the miRNA is bound.

3d illustration of single-strand ribonucleic acid
Artist drawing of single-stranded RNA. Photo used under license by nobeastsofierce/Shutterstock.com.

Using an online microRNA target prediction database called miRDB, the group identified two microRNAs that could be responsible for these changes in gene expression through binding to the ATXN1 5’ UTR. By increasing the expression of one of these microRNAs, called miR760, ataxin-1 protein levels were reduced in cell culture. Conversely, using a miR760 inhibitor so that the miRNA could not perform its normal functions led to increased levels of ataxin-1. Together this shows that miR760 negatively regulates ataxin-1 expression.

Continue reading “Regulating ataxin-1 expression as a therapeutic avenue for SCA1”

Elongating expansions in HD and SCA1

Written by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic  Edited by Dr. Larissa Nitschke

Expanded CAG repeats are the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). Longer inherited CAG expansions correlate with the earlier disease onset and worse symptoms. We know from past research that these expansions are unstable and become longer from one generation to the next.

This study by Mouro Pinto and colleagues shows that repeat expansions also keep getting longer throughout life in patients affected with HD and SCA1 in many cells, including brain, muscle, and liver cells.

Expansion of CAG repeats in different human genes cause several neurodegenerative diseases. This includes Huntington’s disease (HD) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). These long CAG repeats in disease genes tend to be unstable in the sperm and egg cells. This instability in sperm and egg cells can result in either longer repeat tracts (expansions) or shorter ones (contractions) in the children of affected patients. Unfortunately, CAG repeats more often expand than shrink. This results in a worse disease in the affected children, with earlier onset and more severe symptoms than their parents.

However, repeat instability and expansion of repeats are not confined to the sperm and egg cells. It can occur in many cells in a patient’s body. This ongoing expansion that occurs in other body cells is called somatic expansion.

Abstract background of DNA sequence
Long CAG repeats in disease genes can be unstable and expand. Photo used under license by Enzozo/Shutterstock.com.

As affected patients age, the ongoing somatic expansion, especially in the brain, may accelerate the onset of neuronal dysfunction and loss of neurons and. This may worsen the disease progression. This has been previously shown in mouse models and patients with HD. However, those studies examined expansion in only a few brain regions and tissues outside the brain (called peripheral tissues).

In this study lead by Dr. Vanessa C. Wheeler, the authors systematically examined repeat instability in 26 different regions of the brain, post-mortem cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nine peripheral tissues, including testis and ovaries from seven patients with HD and one patient with SCA1.

Continue reading “Elongating expansions in HD and SCA1”