VEGF-mimicking nanoparticles improve SCA1 disease phenotype in mice

Written by Dr. Chandrakanth Edamakanti Edited by Dr. David Bushart

VEGF nanoparticles offer a new avenue for developing treatments for SCA1 and other neurodegenerative disorders

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a neurogenerative disorder with symptoms that typically begin in the third or fourth decade of life. The disease is characterized mainly by motor incoordination that becomes progressively worse with age. Eventually, patients succumb to the disease about fifteen years after onset due to breathing problems. SCA1 is known as a “polyglutamine expansion” disorder, which means it is caused by a glutamine-rich region of a protein becomes abnormally large due to a genetic mutation. In SCA1, the polyglutamine expansion occurs due to a mutation in the ataxin-1 gene (ATXN1), causing the subsequent ataxin-1 protein to have abnormal functions.

Previously, a research team led by Dr. Puneet Opal found that the levels of a protein called VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) is reduced in cerebellum of a mouse model of SCA1. The team was able to improve disease symptoms in these mice by restoring VEGF protein levels using two different methods: i) by crossing the SCA1 mice with another strain of mouse that expressed high levels of VEGF, and ii) delivering recombinant protein (rVEGF) into the brains of SCA1 mice (Cvetanovic M et al 2011). However, the researchers noted that it would be challenging to implement the rVEGF delivery strategy for clinical therapy, since one would need to overcome the extreme financial cost and difficulty that comes with using recombinant proteins.

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VEGF is crucial for maintaining the microvasculature (small arteries and veins) in the brain and also supports neuronal health and regeneration. Current evidence suggests that VEGF therapy could be beneficial for several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and ALS. Unfortunately, significant impediments have prevented the translation of recombinant VEGF therapy to the clinic. In a recently published ‘Brain’ research article, Dr. Opal and his team sought to address this obstacle by exploring a potential low-cost VEGF treatment strategy known as VEGF peptide mimetics. These peptide mimetics are smaller and simpler molecules that mimic biological compounds; in this case, VEGF. Peptide mimetics are typically smaller than the original molecule (small enough to be considered “nanoparticles”), which helps limit side effects and makes delivery to the target much easier than using recombinant proteins like rVEGF.

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A Combined Approach to Treatment: Targeting PAKs in SCA1

Written by Carrie A. Sheeler  Edited by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic

Group 1 p21-associated kinases (PAKs) present a new avenue for SCA1 research.

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is caused by a specific mutation in the Ataxin1 gene, which causes the protein that’s made from that gene (also called Ataxin1) to have an abnormally elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. This leads to dysfunction and death in the affected cells of the brain (predominantly Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum), which causes symptoms in patients that include a progressive worsening of coordination and balance. While there is currently no cure for SCA1, several studies suggest that lowering the amount of Ataxin1 protein in the brain may delay the onset of the disease and decrease the severity of symptoms. This leads us to an important question: how do we most effectively decrease the amount of Ataxin1 in SCA1 patients? One paper recently published by Bondar and colleagues suggests that a multi-pronged approach could be the most effective means of reducing this toxic protein.

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Evidence suggests combining two potential treatments has a greater impact than each treatment on its own. Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

The amount of any specific protein in the body can be altered by either decreasing the amount of protein produced or increasing the rate at which cells break those proteins down. Proteins are made using messenger RNA (mRNA), which is created following specific instructions found in DNA. Decreasing the production or stability of mRNA decreases the amount of corresponding protein made. One way to target the mRNA that causes production of a specific protein is with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). ASOs are designed to target specific mRNA sequences by binding to them directly. Binding of ASOs to mRNA causes those molecules to be marked for destruction within the cell. Proteins in the body are also regularly recycled, but without the blueprints to build a new protein, cells cannot replenish the protein supply it loses over time. So, if Ataxin1 mRNAs are targeted and destroyed by ASO treatment, the amount of Ataxin1 in our cells would theoretically decrease.

Some proteins can also be altered by other proteins, creating another way that their stability, shape, and function can be regulated. This leads us to the other way we can alter the amount of a specific protein in a cell: regulating the regulators. In terms of SCA1, this could mean removing a protein that helps stabilize Ataxin1 or increasing the production of a protein that breaks Ataxin1 down. Previous research has identified several proteins of interest that regulate Ataxin1 protein stability, including several kinases. Kinases are a class of proteins that transfer a phosphate group from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to another protein in the cell. The addition of this phosphate group acts as an energy source to the receiving protein, altering its stability or how it interacts with other molecules in the cell (usually by causing it to change its shape). Recently, Bondar and colleagues have identified a new potential regulator of Ataxin1: a group of proteins known as p21-activated kinases (PAKs) (Bondar et al 2018).

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Mitochondrial Dysfunction Found in SCA1 Purkinje Cells

Written by Dr. Terri M Driessen Edited by Dr. David Bushart

Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial DNA is identified in an SCA1 mouse model.

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes cell death in certain parts of the brain. The brain regions affected play important roles in motor coordination. The loss of coordination and movement – a symptom called ataxia – is the one of the primary effects of this disease. To investigate the causes of SCAs, researchers often use mouse models. In mouse models of SCA1, there are deficits in motor coordination before a significant amount of neurons (i.e., brain cells) are lost. This suggests that changes in neuron function, and not necessarily neuron death, may cause behavioral changes in SCA1. However, the mechanisms that cause dysfunction in SCA1 neurons are still a mystery.

Diagram of neuron, highlighting the nucleus, cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, membrane, mitochondria, microtubules, myelin sheath, lysosome, smooth ER, rough ER, dendritic spines, and dendrite.
Image courtesy of Blausen Medical on Wikimedia Commons.

The brain requires a lot of energy to function. Without this energy, our neurons would be unable to survive. The cellular machines that generate this energy are the mitochondria, which are small organelles found in neurons (and nearly every other type of cell, for that matter). If the mitochondria in neurons do not function properly, this could lead to abnormal neuronal functioning. In fact, mitochondrial dysfunction has been found in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease), Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Huntington’s Disease. Previous studies have also linked mitochondrial dysfunction to SCA1. It has been shown that Purkinje cells, the major cell type affected in SCA1, have altered levels of mitochondria-related RNA and proteins in SCA1 mouse models (Stucki, et al. 2016; Ferro, et al. 2017).

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Approaching the age of clinical therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

Written by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic Edited by Dr. Maxime W. Rousseaux

New research (published Nov. 2018) reveals promising potential genetic therapy for SCA1.

A research team comprised of scientists from academia and industry have tested a new treatment for Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), bringing disease-modifying therapy one step closer to the clinic. SCA1 is a dominantly-inherited ataxia that is currently untreatable. Symptoms of the disease include progressive loss of balance, slurring of speech, difficulties with swallowing and coughing, mild cognitive impairments, and depression. With a life expectancy after diagnosis of only 10-15 years, SCA1 is one of the fastest-progressing SCAs: after symptoms first appear, patients typically have just over a decade before these symptoms become so severe that they cause death (often due to respiratory failure). In 1993, collaborative efforts from the laboratories of Drs. Harry T. Orr and Huda Y. Zoghbi discovered that SCA1 is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat somewhere in a patient’s DNA. CAG repeats cause a polyglutamine expansion in the protein that the mutated gene encodes; in this case, the group later identified that this had occurred in Ataxin-1 (ATXN1), the gene that encodes the ATXN1 protein. The SCA1 mouse models that Drs. Orr and Zoghbi generated (and graciously shared with the scientific community) have allowed for significant advances in the understanding of SCA1 pathogenesis over the years. Now, they provide preclinical evidence of a promising therapy to alter the progressive motor deficits and fatal outcome of SCA1.

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Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 is Caused by a Trinucleotide DNA Repeat

Written by Hillary Handler  Edited by Dr. David Bushart

How researchers found that SCA1 is caused by an expanded, repetitive DNA sequence – a discovery that has allowed for accurate SCA1 diagnosis and more focused research strategies

Before the true genetic basis of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 (SCA1) was discovered, researchers and medical doctors noticed that SCA1 causes motor dysfunction, death of specific types of brain cells, and premature death in affected patients. By assessing health outcomes in multiple families affected by SCA1, scientists also recognized that the disease is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This means that each person with an SCA1 diagnosis has a 50% chance of passing the disease to each of his or her children. In addition, researchers noticed that affected members of SCA1 families displayed a disease feature called anticipation: a trend of increasing symptom severity and earlier age-of-onset as the disease is passed from generation to generation. Despite these discoveries, the specific genetic mutation responsible for causing SCA1 had not yet been identified or described. Determining the genetic cause of an inherited disease is critical for allowing accurate diagnosis of the condition. Furthermore, understanding the genetics of SCA1 would provide researchers with important clues about disease pathology that could help with designing and developing treatments.

Researcher looking through a microscope
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One of the groups that sought to identify the specific genetic cause of SCA1 was led by Dr. Harry Orr. These researchers published their findings in a landmark 1993 paper (Nature Genetics, 1993), which described the process by which they made their discovery. First, a technique called “linkage analysis” was used to determine the general location of the SCA1 gene within the human genome. By tracking how SCA1 is inherited relative to other, well-characterized genetic locations, the team was able to narrow their search to a small portion of chromosome 6’s short arm known as region 6p22-6p23. The researchers also noted that anticipation is often indicative of a particular DNA feature known as a trinucleotide repeat. To determine if a trinucleotide repeat was indeed causing SCA1, these scientists used DNA cloning and screening techniques within the identified region of chromosome 6. These experiments identified a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the SCA1 genomic target region of DNA.

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