Snapshot: How do clinicians measure the severity of ataxia in patients?

Coordination of smooth and effective movements is essential in daily tasks, such as speaking or walking. The ability to successfully orchestrate these movements is commonly referred to as “motor coordination”. While SCA patients can generally initiate movements with their bodies, their ability to execute these in a smooth and precise fashion is impaired. For instance, motor incoordination can be seen in a patient with ataxia’s inability to walk in a straight line, or in the difficulty they experience when swallowing. These and other motor function problems can greatly impact daily life. Assessing how well a patient can perform these movements provides an indication of how affected they are by the disease.

Black pencil lying on top of paper that has scoring chart on it
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Unlike what’s measured with more familiar medical tests, such as blood pressure or levels of blood sugar, human movement cannot be quantified easily with clear numbers. To address this, multiple rates scales have been developed to help measure standardize motor coordination examinations. One of these scales is the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). An experienced clinician (typically a neurologist) evaluates a patient’s ability to perform a series of tasks (such as standing and walking) and then, using the SARA, assigns a score for each task. The process takes about 15-20 minutes, and typically involves the following tests:

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