Mitochondrially Stressed

Written by Dr. Judit M. Pérez Ortiz Edited by Dr. Brenda Toscano Márquez

Scientists describe how SCA2 oxidative stress can affect mitochondrial function, and potentially how to fix it

Mitochondrial Stress

We all have experienced stress. When cramming for an exam last minute, or getting ready for a job interview, our bodies feel stress-related energetic drive and hyperfocus. Small bursts of stress can help us get through specific demands, but too much constant stress takes a toll and makes it difficult for us to function. It turns out that the cells in our bodies experience stress too! While the stress response that we experience in our hectic lives is associated with stress hormones, the stress cells experience is from another source altogether – mitochondria. Scientists at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark identified a novel link between mitochondrial oxidative stress and spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2).

Classically, we learn that mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell responsible for making the bulk of the energy currency that cells need to work and survive, ATP. To do this, mitochondria rely on a cooperative group of protein complexes called the Electron Transport Chain (ETC). Albeit via a more sophisticated procedure than a hot-potato game, the complexes mediate chemical reactions (called redox reactions) by which “hot” electrons are passed from high energy molecules to lower-energy molecules, and so on. The final electron recipient (“acceptor”) is a stable oxygen molecule and their encounter is used to make water. The activity of the ETC helps harness energy that is ultimately used to make ATP in what is called oxidative phosphorylation.

Sometimes not all the electrons make it through; the hot potato “drops”. Electrons leak out and react directly with molecular oxygen (chemical formula O2), turning unstable superoxide (chemical formula O2) which in turn, can create other reactive oxygen species (ROS). The extra electron in superoxide gives it a negative charge and makes it highly reactive and toxic. Just like the small amount of stress primes your body for a challenge to come, low levels of ROS hints the cell that it needs to make some changes to optimize the system. As the superoxide levels go up, cells make more antioxidant enzymes available to keep ROS in check. Antioxidant enzymes convert the highly reactive superoxide to a less reactive hydrogen peroxide (like the one in your bathroom cabinet). This, in turn, can be converted to water and ordinary oxygen molecules. In a word, the antioxidants “detox” the cells from ROS insult.

The cell becomes “stressed out” when there’s too much ROS that can’t be compensated for. This stress caused by oxygen or “oxidative stress” can damage DNA, fats, and proteins that affect the cell and organism as a whole. For example, oxidative stress can contribute to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases.

cartoon drawing of human cells that are blue
An artist’s drawing of human cells under a microscope.

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