Spotlight: The CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team

Location: University of Minnesota, MN, USA

Year Research Group Founded:  2008

What models and techniques do you use?

A photo of the CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team
A photo of the CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team in 2019. Front row, left to right – Diane Hutter, Christophe Lenglet (PI), Gulin Oz (PI), Katie Gundry, Jayashree Chandrasekaran Back row, left to right: Brian Hanna, James Joers, Pramod Pisharady, Kathryn France, Pierre-Gilles Henry (PI), Dinesh Deelchand, Young Woo Park, Isaac Adanyeguh (insert)

Research Group Focus

What shared research questions is your group investigating?

We use high field, multi-nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to explore how diseases impact the central nervous system. These changes can be structural, functional, biochemical and metabolic alterations. For example, we apply advanced MRI and MRS methods in neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes.

We also lead efforts in research taking place at multiple different cities across the United States and the world. As you can imagine, studies spread out across such a big area require a lot of coordination and standardization. We design robust MRI and MRS methods to be used in clinical settings like these.

Another important question for our team is how early microstructural, chemical and functional changes can be detected in the brain and spinal cord by these advanced MR methods. We are interested in looking at these changes across all stages of disease.

Why does your group do this research?

The methods we use (MRI and MRS) can provide very helpful information to be used in clinical trials. These biomarkers we look at can provide quantitative information about how a disease is progressing or changing.

There is good evidence that subtle changes in the brain can be detected by these advanced MR technologies even before patients start having symptoms. If we better understand the earliest changes that are happening in the brain, this can in turn enable interventions at a very early stage. For example, we could treat people even before brain degeneration starts to take place.

Why did you form a research group connecting multiple labs?

We came together to form the CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team to benefit from our shared and complementary expertise, experience, and personnel. We can do more together than we could apart.

Are you recruiting human participants for research?

Yes, we are! We are looking for participants for multiple different studies. You can learn more about the research we are recruiting for at the following links: READISCA,  TRACK-FA, NAF Studies, and FARA Studies. More information is also available through the UMN Ataxia Center.

A photo of the CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team in 2016
A photo of the CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team in 2016, in front of the historic 4T scanner where the first functional MR images were obtained, in CMRR courtyard. Left to right – Christophe Lenglet (PI), Sarah Larson, Gulin Oz (PI), Dinesh Deelchand, Pierre-Gilles Henry (PI), James Joers, Diane Hutter

What Labs Make Up the CMRR Ataxia Imaging Team?

The Oz Lab

Principal Investigator:  Dr. Gulin Oz

Year Founded:  2006

Our focus is on MR spectroscopy, specifically neurochemistry and metabolism studies. We focus on spinocerebellar ataxias. Also, we have been leading MRS technology harmonization across different sites and vendors.

The Henry Lab

Principal Investigator: Dr. Pierre-Gilles Henry

Year Founded:  2006

We develop advanced methods for MR spectroscopy and motion correction. Then apply these new methods to the study of biochemistry and metabolism in the brain and spinal cord in various diseases. We have been working on ataxias since 2014.

Fun Fact about the Henry Lab: The French language can often be heard in discussions in our lab!

The Lenglet Lab

Principal Investigator:  Dr. Christophe Lenglet

Year Founded:  2011

We develop mathematical and computational strategies for human brain and spinal cord connectivity mapping. We do this using high field MRI. Our research aims at better understanding the central nervous system anatomical and functional connectivity. We are especially interested in looking at this in the context of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

Fun Fact

Members of our team have their roots in 7 countries (US, Turkey, France, India, Mauritius, South Korea, Ghana) and 4 continents (North America, Europe, Asia, Africa)

For More Information, check out the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) Website!


Written by Dr. Gulin Oz, Dr. Pierre-Gilles Henry, and Dr. Christophe Lenglet, Edited by Celeste Suart

Snapshot: What is Neurogenesis?

Neurons are the cells that serve as building blocks of the nervous system. The brain contains an enormous variety of neurons, and they all need to get a start somewhere. The process by which neurons are formed is called neurogenesis.

An artist’s drawing of neurons in the brain. Photo used under license by Andrii Vodolazhskyi/Shutterstock.com.

When does neurogenesis happen?

Nearly all neurogenesis occurs before the age of 2 when the brain is in the early stages of being formed and refined. While most cells in the body are replaced as they wear out or get injured, neurons in the brain do not. By young adulthood, the brain has largely stopped making new neurons. Other than serving as an excellent reason to wear a helmet and otherwise protect your head from injury, this lack of new neuron formation doesn’t have a noticeable effect on how we go about our daily lives. After all, neurons are an incredibly adaptable cell type that readily change in response to a person’s environment and experiences.

In the past few decades, we have learned that there is an exception to the “all neurons are born early in life” rule. Some research has shown that new neurons can, in fact, be formed during adulthood in specific brain areas. For example, the hippocampus, a brain structure important for its role in forming and maintaining memories, continues to create neurons over the course of one’s life.

The purpose of these newly generated neurons is still debated. However, numerous studies have shown that neuron formation in the hippocampus is reduced in instances of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This includes certain types of ataxia like SCA1. This is thought to contribute to changes in cognitive function and mood, though the exact mechanisms are still being determined.

Why is neurogenesis interesting for the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), aren’t these neurodegenerative disorders?

Since the discovery of neurodegenerative disorders, most research has focused on symptoms and how to delay symptom onset. This view sees neurodegenerative disorders, like the SCAs, as outcomes of mid to late-life when the toxic effects of mutant proteins become suddenly rampant. However, these disorders are caused by proteins that are present from the very earliest stages of brain formation.

In 2018, researchers studying SCA1 found that neurogenesis is increased in the cerebellum of young mice. This changed how the cerebellum communicates with the rest of the brain. This suggests that cerebellar function can be affected by more than neuronal loss. It could be of wider interest in the SCAs given the cerebellar dysfunction that is common between them. No research on cerebellar neurogenesis has been performed in other SCAs by this point. However, there are some indications that neurogenesis may also be altered in SCA2.

Additionally, Huntington’s Disease, a polyglutamine repeat disorder in the same disease family as several SCAs, has been shown to have increased neurogenesis in the cortex in both young mice and prenatal babies. The combination of these recent studies has made early neuron formation an area of key interest in the study of neurodegenerative disorders.

Current theories in the field contend that while the brain can compensate for changes in neuron numbers in early life, altered neurogenesis could be creating unique brain circuitry in individuals with known disorder-causing protein mutations. These changes could make them more vulnerable to neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration later in life.

Evidence for changed neurogenesis in SCAs, both early and late in life, adds a new layer of consideration to what we broadly think of as a mid- to late-life neurodegenerative disease. Additional research in coming years will hopefully provide more insight into how these additional facets of neural health may inform the development of new therapies.

If you would like to learn more about neurogenesis, take a look at these resources by the Queensland Brain Insitute and News-Medical.

Snapshot written by Carrie Sheeler and edited by Dr. Chloe Soutar.

Additional References

Cvetanovic M, Hu YS, Opal P. Mutant Ataxin-1 Inhibits Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation in SCA1. Cerebellum. 2017 Apr;16(2):340-347. doi: 10.1007/s12311-016-0794-9. PMID: 27306906; PMCID: PMC5510931.

Shukla JP, Deshpande G, Shashidhara LS. Ataxin 2-binding protein 1 is a context-specific positive regulator of Notch signaling during neurogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Development. 2017 Mar 1;144(5):905-915. doi: 10.1242/dev.140657. Epub 2017 Feb 7. PMID: 28174239; PMCID: PMC5374347.

Xia G, Santostefano K, Hamazaki T, Liu J, Subramony SH, Terada N, Ashizawa T. Generation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 in vitro. J Mol Neurosci. 2013 Oct;51(2):237-48. doi: 10.1007/s12031-012-9930-2. Epub 2012 Dec 9. PMID: 23224816; PMCID: PMC3608734.

Barnat M, Capizzi M, Aparicio E, Boluda S, Wennagel D, Kacher R, Kassem R, Lenoir S, Agasse F, Braz BY, Liu JP, Ighil J, Tessier A, Zeitlin SO, Duyckaerts C, Dommergues M, Durr A, Humbert S. Huntington’s disease alters human neurodevelopment. Science. 2020 Aug 14;369(6505):787-793. doi: 10.1126/science.aax3338. Epub 2020 Jul 16. PMID: 32675289; PMCID: PMC7859879.

Elongating expansions in HD and SCA1

Written by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic  Edited by Dr. Larissa Nitschke

Expanded CAG repeats are the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). Longer inherited CAG expansions correlate with the earlier disease onset and worse symptoms. We know from past research that these expansions are unstable and become longer from one generation to the next.

This study by Mouro Pinto and colleagues shows that repeat expansions also keep getting longer throughout life in patients affected with HD and SCA1 in many cells, including brain, muscle, and liver cells.

Expansion of CAG repeats in different human genes cause several neurodegenerative diseases. This includes Huntington’s disease (HD) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). These long CAG repeats in disease genes tend to be unstable in the sperm and egg cells. This instability in sperm and egg cells can result in either longer repeat tracts (expansions) or shorter ones (contractions) in the children of affected patients. Unfortunately, CAG repeats more often expand than shrink. This results in a worse disease in the affected children, with earlier onset and more severe symptoms than their parents.

However, repeat instability and expansion of repeats are not confined to the sperm and egg cells. It can occur in many cells in a patient’s body. This ongoing expansion that occurs in other body cells is called somatic expansion.

Abstract background of DNA sequence
Long CAG repeats in disease genes can be unstable and expand. Photo used under license by Enzozo/Shutterstock.com.

As affected patients age, the ongoing somatic expansion, especially in the brain, may accelerate the onset of neuronal dysfunction and loss of neurons and. This may worsen the disease progression. This has been previously shown in mouse models and patients with HD. However, those studies examined expansion in only a few brain regions and tissues outside the brain (called peripheral tissues).

In this study lead by Dr. Vanessa C. Wheeler, the authors systematically examined repeat instability in 26 different regions of the brain, post-mortem cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nine peripheral tissues, including testis and ovaries from seven patients with HD and one patient with SCA1.

Continue reading “Elongating expansions in HD and SCA1”

Spotlight: The Neuro-D lab Leiden

Principal Investigator: Dr. Willeke van Roon-Mom

Location: Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands

Year Founded: 1995

What disease areas do you research?

What models and techniques do you use?

A group photo of members of the Neuro-D lab Leiden standing outside on a patio.
This is a group picture taken during our brainstorm day last June. From left to right: Boyd Kenkhuis, Elena Daoutsali, Tom Metz, Ronald Buijsen, Willeke van Roon-Mom (PI), David Parfitt, Hannah Bakels, Barry Pepers, Linda van der Graaf and Elsa Kuijper. Image courtesy of Ronald Buijsen.

Research Focus

What is your research about?

The Neuro-D research group studies how diseases develop and progress at the molecular level in several neurodegenerative diseases. They focus on diseases that have protein aggregation, where the disease proteins clump up into bundles in the brain and don’t work correctly.

We focus strongly on translational research, meaning we try to bridge the gap between research happening in the laboratory to what is happening in medical clinics. To do this we use more “traditional” research models like animal and cell models. But we also use donated patient tissues and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models, which is closer to what is seen in medical clinics.

Our aim is to unravel what is going wrong in these diseases, then discover and test potential novel drug targets and therapies.

One thing we are doing to work towards this goal is identifying biomarkers to measure how diseases progress over time. To do this, we use sequencing technology and other techniques to look at new and past data from patients.

Why do you do this research?

So far there are no therapies to stop the progression of ataxia. If we can understand what is happening in diseases in individual cells, we can develop therapies that can halt or maybe even reverse disease progression.

Identifying biomarkers is also important, because it will help us figure out the best time to treat patients when we eventually have a therapy to test.

Stylized logo for the Dutch Center for RNA Therapeutics
The Neuro-D lab Leiden is part of the Dutch Center for RNA Therapeutics, which focuses on RNA therapies like antisense oligonucleotides. Logo designed by Justus Kuijer (VormMorgen), as 29 year old patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Are you recruiting human participants for research?

Yes, we are! We are looking for participants for a SCA1 natural history study and biomarker study. More information can be found here. Please note that information about this study is only available in Dutch.

Fun Fact

All our fridges and freezers have funny names like walrus, seal, snow grouse and snowflake.

For More Information, check out the Neuro-D lab Leiden website!


Written by Dr. Ronald Buijsen, Edited by Celeste Suart

Spotlight: The Truant Lab

Truant lab logo of a brain. "Bright minds fixing sick brains"

Principal Investigator: Dr. Ray Truant

Location: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Year Founded: 1999

What disease areas do you research?

  • SCA1
  • SCA7
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease

What models and techniques do you use?

  • Human cell biology
  • High content screening
  • Biophotonics
  • Microscopy

Research Focus

What is your research about?

We are looking into the role of oxidative DNA damage as a trigger to diseases like ataxia and neurodegeneration. We examine the roles of the disease proteins (ataxin-1, ataxin-7, etc,) and genes which modify or change disease that are involved with DNA damage repair.

Why do you do this research?

We are looking at what triggers the very first steps of disease. If we can understand this, we can design a treatment to stop it from happening in the first place.

Research team of 10 holding a sign which reads "We are Ataxia Aware"
Group picture of the Truant Laboratory celebrating International Ataxia Awareness Day 2019.

Fun Lab Fact

All our fridges in the laboratory are named after Game of Thrones characters! (We have several proud nerds in the lab)

For More Information, check out the Truant Lab Website!

We have an open lab notebook blog where our post-doctoral fellow Dr. Tam Maiuri post updates on her experiments in real-time! We plan to launch an ataxia open notebook in Winter 2021.


Written by Ray Truant, Edited by Celeste Suart