Identifying FDA-approved molecules to treat SCA6

Written by Dr Hannah Shorrock Edited by Dr. Larissa Nitschke

Pastor and colleagues identify FDA-approved small molecules that selectively reduce the toxic polyglutamine-expanded protein in SCA6.

Selectively targeting disease-causing genes without disrupting cellular functions is essential for successful therapy development. In spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), achieving this selectivity is particularly complicated as the disease-causing gene produces two proteins that contain an expanded polyglutamine tract. In this study, Pastor and colleagues identified several Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved small molecules that selectively reduce the levels of one of these polyglutamine-containing proteins without affecting the levels of the other protein, which is essential for normal brain function. By using drugs already approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration to treat other diseases, referred to as FDA-approved drugs, the team hopes to reduce the time frame for pre-clinical therapy development.

SCA6 is an autosomal dominant ataxia that causes progressive impairment of movement and coordination. This is due to the dysfunction and death of brain cells, including Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. SCA6 is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the CACNA1A gene. CACNA1A encodes two proteins: the a1A subunit, the main pore-forming subunit of the P/Q type voltage-gated calcium ion channel, as well as a transcription factor named a1ACT.

The a1A subunit is essential for life. Its function is less affected by the presence of the expanded polyglutamine tract than that of a1ACT. The transcription factor, a1ACT, controls the expression of various genes involved in the development of Purkinje cells. Expressing a1ACT protein containing an expanded polyglutamine tract in mice causes cerebellar atrophy and ataxia. While reducing levels of the a1A subunit may have little effect on SCA6 disease but impact normal brain cell function, reducing levels of a1ACT may improve disease in SCA6. Therefore, Pastor and colleagues decided to test the hypothesis that selectively reducing levels of the a1ACT protein without affecting levels of the a1A protein may be a viable therapeutic approach for SCA6.

Colorful pile of medicines in blister packs which color are White, Yellow, Black and Pink pills.
By using drugs already approved by the FDA, the team hopes to reduce the time frame for pre-clinical therapy development. Photo used under license by Wanchana Phuangwan/Shutterstock.com.
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Snapshot: What is Gait Analysis in Ataxia Mouse Models?

A key role of the cerebellum is to control and fine-tune coordinated movement such as walking. Although walking is an unconscious behaviour, it is actually very complex and requires many systems to work together. The specific mannerisms and patterns of coordinated movement that make up how an individual walks are called gait.

Since ataxia affects cells in the cerebellum, many ataxia patients exhibit a change in their gait. This change can reduce their mobility and be disruptive to daily life. Analyzing gait using behavioural experiments in ataxia mouse models helps researchers to better understand the disease. But how exactly does one study gait patterns in a mouse?

Black rat walking in front of white background
Photo used under license by Eric Isselee/Shutterstock.com.

Traditionally, a researcher measures gait by performing a footprint analysis that uses non-toxic water-coloured paint and a long strip of white paper. The front and back feet of the mouse are dipped into two different colours of paint. Then the mouse then runs across the paper leaving a trail of coloured footprints to be analyzed. This allows for several gait measurements to be taken. From this, the researcher can then determine how ataxia changed the mouse’s gait. For example, a researcher can look at if the mouse takes shorter strides than a healthy control or whether the mouse tends to walk in a more crooked manner.

Although easy to perform, footprint analysis is time-consuming and highly prone to error as the experimenter does all measurements with a ruler by hand after the mouse has run. Since gait is a complex action with many variables, some subtle differences may be difficult to detect this way. Luckily, researchers have developed several digital gait analysis systems, such as the DigiGait, CatWalk, and TreadScan systems. These digital gait devices make use of transparent corridors with cameras underneath that allow the researcher to record the running behaviour of the animal. Researchers then use software to automatically detect and analyze the footprints.

One lab has taken gait analysis even further. They developed a method to detect extremely subtle differences in gait that the human eye cannot detect. This technique, called LocoMouse, was developed by the Carey lab to analyze patterns of limb movements, rather than simply footprints. LocoMouse utilizes artificial intelligence to recognize and analyze the movement of limb, tail, and head position in a walking mouse.

Using this, the Carey lab has shown a significant difference between a healthy mouse and one with ataxia. Most importantly, the method also detects differences between different ataxia mouse models. By uncovering subtle differences in gait, researchers may better understand the different underlying physiological changes in the cerebellum in different ataxias.

It should be noted that a key pitfall of studying gait in mice is that they are four-legged while humans walk on two legs. This is important, and means that the variables that affect gait in a mouse will be different than those of a human. There may not be a direct correlation between gait changes in ataxia patients and gait changes in mice. That being said, gait analysis remains an important tool in the ataxia researchers’ toolbox. It will continue to provide critical insight into how ataxic physiology affects behaviour.

If you would like to learn more about gait analysis in mice, take a look at these resources by the Noldus Information Technology and Mouse Specifics Inc.

Snapshot written by Eviatar Fields and edited by Dr. Chandana Kondapalli.

Elongating expansions in HD and SCA1

Written by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic  Edited by Dr. Larissa Nitschke

Expanded CAG repeats are the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). Longer inherited CAG expansions correlate with the earlier disease onset and worse symptoms. We know from past research that these expansions are unstable and become longer from one generation to the next.

This study by Mouro Pinto and colleagues shows that repeat expansions also keep getting longer throughout life in patients affected with HD and SCA1 in many cells, including brain, muscle, and liver cells.

Expansion of CAG repeats in different human genes cause several neurodegenerative diseases. This includes Huntington’s disease (HD) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs). These long CAG repeats in disease genes tend to be unstable in the sperm and egg cells. This instability in sperm and egg cells can result in either longer repeat tracts (expansions) or shorter ones (contractions) in the children of affected patients. Unfortunately, CAG repeats more often expand than shrink. This results in a worse disease in the affected children, with earlier onset and more severe symptoms than their parents.

However, repeat instability and expansion of repeats are not confined to the sperm and egg cells. It can occur in many cells in a patient’s body. This ongoing expansion that occurs in other body cells is called somatic expansion.

Abstract background of DNA sequence
Long CAG repeats in disease genes can be unstable and expand. Photo used under license by Enzozo/Shutterstock.com.

As affected patients age, the ongoing somatic expansion, especially in the brain, may accelerate the onset of neuronal dysfunction and loss of neurons and. This may worsen the disease progression. This has been previously shown in mouse models and patients with HD. However, those studies examined expansion in only a few brain regions and tissues outside the brain (called peripheral tissues).

In this study lead by Dr. Vanessa C. Wheeler, the authors systematically examined repeat instability in 26 different regions of the brain, post-mortem cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nine peripheral tissues, including testis and ovaries from seven patients with HD and one patient with SCA1.

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El BDNF puede revertir la ataxia en ratones SCA1

Escrito por Anna Cook Editado por Dr. David Bushart. Publicado inicialmente en el 19 de Marzo de 2021. Traducción al español fueron hechas por FEDAES y Carlos Barba.

El factor neurotrófico derivado del cerebro -BDNF- puede prevenir la ataxia en ratones SCA1. Una nueva investigación muestra que el tratamiento funciona incluso si se inicia después de que los ratones desarrollan signos de ataxia.

SCA1 es una enfermedad neurodegenerativa causada por una mutación en el gen Ataxin1 . Las personas con SCA1 a menudo desarrollan síntomas alrededor de los 30-40 años, aunque esto puede variar. Los síntomas más comunes incluyen ataxia o problemas de movimiento que dificultan moverse y caminar. Estos síntomas empeoran progresivamente y eventualmente provocan problemas para tragar o hablar. Actualmente no existe cura para SCA1, por lo que es importante que se realicen investigaciones sobre posibles tratamientos.

El laboratorio de la Dra. Marija Cvetanovic de la Universidad de Minnesota ha estado utilizando un modelo de ratón de SCA1 para tratar de identificar nuevos tratamientos. En el pasado, estos investigadores han demostrado que una molécula llamada factor neurotrófico derivado del cerebro (BDNF) podría retrasar la aparición de ataxia en un modelo de ratón de SCA1.

A laboratory mouse sitting on a researcher's hand.
La investigación con ratones SCA1 muestra que el tratamiento con BDNF puede tener un impacto, incluso después de que comienzan a aparecer los síntomas de la ataxia.. Foto utilizada bajo licencia por unoL/Shutterstock.com.

El BDNF es una molécula que se encuentra en el cerebro y es muy importante para el desarrollo saludable del cerebro. Es necesario para que muchos procesos del cerebro funcionen con normalidad. Los investigadores demostraron que los niveles de BDNF se redujeron en los cerebros de los ratones SCA1. Los investigadores inyectaron BDNF en los cerebros de estos ratones para intentar compensar el BDNF perdido. Este tratamiento, antes de que los ratones comenzaran a desarrollar síntomas de ataxia, previno la aparición de problemas motores y la muerte de las células de Purkinje.

Este trabajo anterior fue muy prometedor, pero había un problema. En este estudio, el tratamiento solo se probó antes de que los ratones SCA1 desarrollaran signos de problemas motores o cambios en sus cerebros. En el mundo real, si queremos ayudar a los pacientes con SCA1, necesitamos tratamientos que funcionen incluso una vez que la enfermedad haya comenzado a progresar. Por lo tanto, era importante que los investigadores averiguaran si este tratamiento funcionaría más adelante en la progresión de la enfermedad. Eso es exactamente lo que hicieron a continuación: en diciembre de 2020, el laboratorio de Cvetanovic publicó los resultados de su estudio que probaba el BDNF como tratamiento después de que los ratones habían comenzado a desarrollar signos de SCA1.

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Snapshot: What is the Morris Water Maze Test?

Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are well known for worsening motor coordination symptoms caused by the degeneration of the cerebellum. Yet, increasing reports indicate that broader changes are occurring in the brains of some SCA patients. This includes changes in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning and memory. One way to test learning and memory in mice is the Morris Water Maze Test. Researchers use this test on SCA mouse models to investigate how and when learning and memory symptoms arise. More importantly, we can also use this test to evaluate the effect of potential treatments on learning and memory.

white mouse swimming with its head poking up above the water
Although mice can swim quite well, they don’t like swimming. The Morris Water Maze takes advantage of this to test the learning and memory of mice. Photo used under license by Aleksandar Risteski/Shutterstock.com.

The Morris Water Maze consists of a large circular pool of opaque water. A platform is placed in the pool just under the surface of the water so that the mouse won’t be able to see it. Though mice are good swimmers, they don’t particularly enjoy swimming. Mice will always attempt to find the platform as quickly as possible. Shapes on the walls around the pool help the mice orient themselves within the pool (first panel in the figure below).

The first time a mouse swims in the pool (second panel in the figure), the mouse tends to swim aimlessly around until they eventually find the hidden platform. Each subsequent time the mouse swims in the pool, the mouse will get better and better. Using the shapes on the wall to help identify where they are in the pool, the mouse will eventually learn and memorize the platform’s location.

First day, mouse does not know wehere the plaform is an swims a lot. Second day, the mouse still swims a while but remembers where the platform is. On the last day, the mouse knows where the platform is and goes right there.
The three steps in the Morris Water Maze. Image made by Larissa Nitschke use BioRender.

As that happens, they will be better and better at the task. Eventually, the mice will swim immediately to the platform when placed in the pool (third panel in the figure). Researchers can measure this improvement by measuring how much time it takes the mouse to reach the platform and the length of its path to the platform. Additionally, to assess the strength of the memory, researchers can take out the platform from the pool in what is called a “probe trial”. Mice that spend more time in the area where the platform used to be are considered to have built the strongest memories of that location.

As is the case for some SCA mouse models, mice with impaired learning and memory have more difficulty learning and remembering the correct location of the platform. As a result, they spend a longer time searching for and swim longer distances to the platform. Overall, they display a poorer improvement over time. By using the Morris Water Maze Test on SCA models that receive different treatments, scientists can then further test which therapy could improve their learning and memory symptoms. Therefore, the Morris Water Maze Test may help identify new therapeutic strategies to treat learning and memory problems in patients.

If you would like to learn more about the Morris Water Maze, take a look at these resources by the Scholarpedia and JOVE.

Snapshot written by Carrie Sheeler and edited by Dr. Larissa Nitschke.