International Ataxia Awareness Day 2019

Today marks International Ataxia Awareness Day (IAAD), which is celebrated every year on September 25th. IAAD brings people together from around the world to raise awareness about this group of rare diseases and to raise money for continuing research efforts. For more information on how you can participate in IAAD this year, take a look at the National Ataxia Foundation’s event page.

group of people, including some wheelchair users, stand in a circle holding their hands up. They are happy. Overtop is the IAAD2019 logo and website. www.ataxia.org
Image courtesy of the NAF.

Here at SCAsource, we are celebrating IAAD 2019 by highlighting our top ten most-read articles from this year. We hope you enjoy reading these throwbacks!

10. Decreasing ATXN3 levels can alleviate some symptoms in an SCA3 mouse model

Antisense oligonucleotides: a potential treatment for SCA3 that partially rescues SCA3 disease mouse models.

9. The Discovery of SCA8

How one team uncovered the first SCA known to be caused by a CTG repeat expansion mutation.

8. Approaching the age of clinical therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

New research (published Nov. 2018) reveals promising potential genetic therapy for SCA1.

7. Protein kinase C to the Rescue in Spinocerebellar Ataxias

Protein kinase C: one protein that may help to protect against cerebellar neuronal dysfunction & death in spinocerebellar ataxias.

6. Early Cerebellum Development Abnormality in Adult-Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1

Researchers for the first time identified that spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) may have roots in early cerebellar circuit malfunction.

5. Snapshot: What are Clinical Trials?

Ever wonder what clinical trial “phases” mean? Why do trials need so many phases? How does this help test how safe a new treatment is? Here’s a quick overview of how drugs get from an idea in a research lab to market.

4. Dynamic duo strikes again – Orr and Zoghbi discover the primary driver of SCA1 pathology in the cerebellum

Research group uncovers the key molecular interaction that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1).

3. ASOs clear toxic protein from cells, reducing ataxia in SCA2 mice

Scientists uncover a promising therapeutic avenue to treat spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2).

2. A novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of SCA3 

Researchers in the Netherlands uncover a new way to treat SCA3.

And last, but certainly not least:

1. Accidental discovery reveals possible link between cerebellar function and motivation

Stanford researchers accidentally discover a new role (reward prediction) for the cerebellum, the primary brain region affected by spinocerebellar ataxias.

logo of IAAD2019: a globe with multiple people from around the world marked on it

Non-invasive imaging of neurodegeneration in live animals

Written by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic   Edited by Larissa Nitschke

Purkinje cells (a type of neuron in the cerebellum) are the most vulnerable cells in many Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs). While animal models of SCA have been very fruitful in understanding the mechanisms of Purkinje cell neurodegeneration, none of these models have allowed for visualization of neurodegenerative processes in live animals as the disease progresses – until now. In the laboratory of Dr. Reinhard Köster, researchers have developed a zebrafish model of SCA that allows for the expression of SCA-causing mutant protein in Purkinje cells and proteins that can be used to monitor Purkinje cell changes. As zebrafish larvae are almost transparent, researchers can now study pathogenic changes in neurons in a live animal during disease progression.

Since the 1993 discovery of the mutation that causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 (SCA1), we have significantly increased our understanding of disease pathogenesis using animal models. While there are advantages and disadvantages of using any model, most researchers would agree that the similarity between humans and the animal used, plus the cost of creating and caring for the animals, are critical determinants of which model to choose. Mouse models, for instance, are useful to study pathogenesis at the molecular, cellular, tissue and behavioral level, but are costly to house and maintain. Fruit fly models, on the other hand, allow high-throughput studies (that is, studies that can produce a lot of relevant data quickly) of disease modifying properties but are much farther from human beings evolutionarily. Unfortunately, neither of these animal models allow us to follow up changes in neurons in the same animal throughout disease progression – to study the neurons, the animal must be euthanized and the brain must be dissected. Understanding how neurons are affected during disease progression, however, is very important. Observing the same neurons over time could increase our understanding of disease processes and inform us about the optimal timing for therapies. For example, if we were to identify changes in neurons that occur just prior to the onset of motor symptoms, this might mean that these changes are a contributing factor to behavioral pathology. This could also tell us the stage at which neurons start dying and disease thus becomes irreversible.

In an effort to examine how cells behave over time, many researchers use zebrafish. The fact that zebrafish embryos (larvae) are mostly transparent means that we can follow changes in neurons throughout disease progression. Moreover, in most SCAs, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum are the neurons that are most affected by the disease-causing mutant protein, and the zebrafish cerebellum has an anatomy and function that is quite similar to the human cerebellum. Zebrafish are also inexpensive and produce hundreds of offspring weekly, providing researchers with a large number of animals to study.

A dozen zebrafish swim in deep blue water. Zebra fish are narrow and long. They have two to three black stripes running down their side.
A school of Zebrafish (Photo by Lynn Ketchum, courtesy of Oregon State University)

Using state-of-the-art genetic approaches, Dr. Reinhard Köster’s laboratory at the Technical University of Braunschweig in Germany created a zebrafish model of SCA that expresses two types of protein in their Purkinje cells: a disease-causing SCA mutant protein, and a fluorescent reporter protein to monitor degenerative changes and cell death.

Continue reading “Non-invasive imaging of neurodegeneration in live animals”

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: A new (old) hope for the treatment of SCA1

Written by Eviatar Fields Edited by Dr. Vitaliy Bondar

Scientists use Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor to delay motor symptom onset and cell death in a mouse model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a rare neurodegenerative disease that affects about 2 out of 100,000 individuals. Patients with SCA1 present with motor symptoms such as disordered walking, poor motor coordination and balance problems by their mid-thirties and will progressively get worse symptoms over the next two decades. No treatments for SCA1 exists. These motor symptoms cause a significant decrease in patient independence and quality of life. Scientists use mouse models that recreate many SCA1 symptoms to understand the cause of this disease and test new treatments.

In this paper, Mellesmoen and colleagues use a mouse model of SCA1 which presents with severe motor symptoms by adulthood. In order to measure the severity of the motor problems in the SCA1 mouse model, the researchers use a test called a rotarod. The rotarod test is similar to a rolling log balance: mice are placed on a rotating drum that slowly accelerates. Mice that can stay on the drum for longer durations have better motor coordination than mice who fall off the drum earlier. Mellesmoen was trying to find a way to get the mice to stay on the drum for longer.

artistic cartoon of male doctor sin from of a microscope and large DNA model
Cartoon of a medical researcher holding a clipboard.

Purkinje cells, the main cells of the cerebellum, eventually die in SCA1 mouse models and in patients later in life. However, it remains unclear how and why these brain cells, which are responsible for the fine-tuning of movement and motor coordination, die. This is an important question as its answer might lead to new treatments that prevent brain cells from dying which might improve SCA1 symptoms. One possibility is that some changes in gene expression (that is, how “active” or “inactive” a gene is) causes the cells to die in SCA1 mice. To test this hypothesis, the authors used a technique called RNA-seq to examine how gene expression is altered in SCA1 mice compared to healthy mice.

Continue reading “Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: A new (old) hope for the treatment of SCA1”

Snapshot: What is RNA?

RNA is an important molecule that helps with regulating the function of cells. To fully understand how RNA fits in here, we must first look at the bigger picture: genetics. The central dogma of molecular biology, depicted below, states that DNA is copied (transcribed) into RNA, which is later decoded (translated) into proteins, which perform many vital functions in the cell. So, when the cell needs a specific protein, it locates the stretch of DNA that contains the code for this protein and starts to write a copy of that stretch of DNA. This copy is made using RNA, or ribonucleic acid, as a backbone. RNA is very similar to DNA, but contains one extra oxygen atom in the basic building block. Only one strand of the DNA is copied, so RNA ends up looking like half a DNA molecule. The RNA molecule can be seen as the messenger between the archive of your genes (DNA) and the protein production site. However, RNA is very versatile and is also involved in protein regulation, transport of molecules and as a structural component of large complexes in the cell.

The "central dogma" of molecular biology: DNA makes RNA, then RNA makes protein.
The “central dogma” of molecular biology: DNA makes RNA, then RNA makes protein. Adapted from Wikimedia.

The shifting stream of RNA

Apart from small random mutations during the course of a lifetime, the DNA contained in every cell remains the same from birth to death. However, since different cells need different proteins at different stages of growth, there needs to be a selection of which genes are copied and translated into proteins. This means that the process of making RNA has to be very flexible. This flexibility is achieved through a large network of signals that tell the cell which regions of DNA should be transcribed into RNA, and at what rate. To keep up with the demands of the cell, there are millions of RNAs being made at all times, to send out instructions to makes proteins.

How can RNA cause disease?

In some spinocerebellar ataxias, such as e.g. SCA8, the messenger RNA molecules contain long repetitive sequences that become sticky to other copies of the same RNA or to proteins, forming both small and large clumps in the cell. There is still controversy surrounding which steps in the process that ultimately causes cell death in large brain areas, but it seems that unsolicited binding of these sticky RNAs to proteins and other RNAs causes disruption to several functions in the cell simultaneously. Therefore, many researchers are hopeful that reducing the amount of these RNAs in the cell using Antisense Oligonucleotides or RNA interference can help treat spinocerebellar ataxias and other similar diseases.

If you would like to learn more about RNA, take a look at these resources by the Encyclopedia Britannica and Khan Academy.

Snapshot written by Frida Niss and edited by Dr. Hayley McLoughlin.

Discovery in mice sheds light on how the brain learns to adjust how we walk (video)

Written by Dr. Ambika Tewari Edited by Dr. Sriram Jayabal

New research identifies the cell type in the cerebellum that is vital for a specific form of motor learning

Locomotion – the process of moving oneself from one place to another – is highly adaptive. Depending on our current needs, we can alter the way we walk (known as our gait) without much trouble. For instance, we might increase our speed to get to a meeting in time or, if we have time for a more relaxing stroll, reduce our speed. This locomotor adaptation may seem effortless, but it actually involves a high level of coordination. It is quite apparent when witnessing a toddler trying to walk that figuring out our adaptive mechanisms plays an important role in fine-tuning movements. Because of this, determining how locomotor adaptation works has become a focus of research in the field of rehabilitative therapy, especially with patient populations that experiences gait deficits.

Young toddler boy learning how to walk and balance
Photo of a toddler how to walk. How does of brain learn how to fine tune our movements to help us balance? Photo by Aleksandr Balandin on Pexels.com

In an effort to better understand the intricate details of locomotor adaptation, researchers at the University of Portugal recently performed a study using adult mice. In this study, mice performed a task on a specialized piece of equipment called a split-belt treadmill, which consists of two separate belts running parallel to each other. The speed of these belts can be independently controlled, allowing researchers to impose different demands to the limbs on the right side of the body versus the left. Though split-belt treadmills are used in rehabilitative therapy for patients with post-stroke hemiparesis (where one side of the body is weakened after stroke), this was the first study that adapted the use of this treadmill for mice.

Continue reading “Discovery in mice sheds light on how the brain learns to adjust how we walk (video)”