Blurred lines: how spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 impacts vision

Written by Siddharth Nath Edited by Dr. Ray Truant

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is unique amongst the SCAs in that it involves an organ besides the brain – the eye. Rather than problems with movement, the first hint that something may be wrong for SCA7 patients is often a subtle change in vision. Research done by Dr. Al La Spada in the early 2000s helps explain how and why this happens. 

It’s not all in your head

The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are, for the most part, similar in how they affect the body. They cause disordered movement (ataxia), trouble with speech (dysarthria), trouble swallowing (dysphagia), and other neurological symptoms. This holds true for all of the polyglutamine-expansion SCAs except for SCA7. In SCA7, doctors have long observed that patients report problems with vision, and in some cases may be entirely blind. Interestingly, these symptoms often appear ahead of any other signs that the patient might have a chronic illness, suggesting that SCA7 affects the eye before it begins to affect the brain.

In the early 2000s, while at the University of Washington, Dr. Al La Spada conducted research into how SCA7 affects the eye. He and his team set out to understand why patients with this disease experience a loss of vision.

Close up photo of a human eye from the side. The eye is hazel in colour.
Close up of a human eye. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

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Mitochondrial Dysfunction Found in SCA1 Purkinje Cells

Written by Dr. Terri M Driessen Edited by Dr. David Bushart

Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial DNA is identified in an SCA1 mouse model.

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes cell death in certain parts of the brain. The brain regions affected play important roles in motor coordination. The loss of coordination and movement – a symptom called ataxia – is the one of the primary effects of this disease. To investigate the causes of SCAs, researchers often use mouse models. In mouse models of SCA1, there are deficits in motor coordination before a significant amount of neurons (i.e., brain cells) are lost. This suggests that changes in neuron function, and not necessarily neuron death, may cause behavioral changes in SCA1. However, the mechanisms that cause dysfunction in SCA1 neurons are still a mystery.

Diagram of neuron, highlighting the nucleus, cytoplasm, golgi apparatus, membrane, mitochondria, microtubules, myelin sheath, lysosome, smooth ER, rough ER, dendritic spines, and dendrite.
Image courtesy of Blausen Medical on Wikimedia Commons.

The brain requires a lot of energy to function. Without this energy, our neurons would be unable to survive. The cellular machines that generate this energy are the mitochondria, which are small organelles found in neurons (and nearly every other type of cell, for that matter). If the mitochondria in neurons do not function properly, this could lead to abnormal neuronal functioning. In fact, mitochondrial dysfunction has been found in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease), Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Huntington’s Disease. Previous studies have also linked mitochondrial dysfunction to SCA1. It has been shown that Purkinje cells, the major cell type affected in SCA1, have altered levels of mitochondria-related RNA and proteins in SCA1 mouse models (Stucki, et al. 2016; Ferro, et al. 2017).

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Where Should We Look to Detect SCA3 Pathology and Progression?

Written by Jorge Diogo Da Silva Edited by Dr. Maria do Carmo Costa

Potential drug targets and biomarkers of SCA3/MJD revealed

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease that usually begins in mid-life. The mutation that causes SCA3 leads to the production of an abnormally large stretch in the gene’s encoded protein, ataxin-3. This irregular ataxin-3 becomes dysfunctional and starts to bundle into toxic aggregates in the brain. SCA3 patients experience a lack of movement coordination, especially when it comes to maintaining their balance while standing or walking, which worsens over time. Currently, there is no cure, effective preventive treatment, or method of monitoring the progression of SCA3. While finding a treatment for SCA3 is undoubtedly needed, identifying markers that are only present in individuals that carry the SCA3 mutation is also critical – it allows researchers and clinicians to track how the disease is progressing, even if the carriers do not show disease symptoms. The use of disease markers is especially important in evaluating the effectiveness of a therapeutic agent during the course of a clinical trial (in this case, one that includes pre-symptomatic carriers).

Textbook diagram of brain
Diagram of the human brain. Picture courtesy of Internet Archive Book Images

The protein ataxin-3 plays many roles in cells, including in transcription – the process by which genes (made of DNA) are transformed into RNA, which in turn encodes all the proteins that are essential to maintaining normal body function. Because the abnormally large ataxin-3 is somehow dysfunctional in SCA3, accurate transcription of genes could be affected. Hence, the authors of this study have looked at transcription in several brain regions in a mouse model of SCA3. These mice harbor the human mutant ataxin-3 gene in their DNA and replicate some of the symptoms that patients experience. In general, this kind of investigation can help provide clues for potential therapeutic strategies, which could work by normalizing the transcription of disease-affected genes. In addition, it can allow researchers to better characterize SCA3-affected genes, which could be used to monitor disease progression if one or more of these genes are affected differently at different stages of the disease. The authors also searched for potential dysregulation of other molecules in the blood of these mice, such as sugars and fats, which is another way disease progression could be monitored. This is particularly useful for patients, as a blood test is much less invasive than any kind of brain analysis. Here, researchers tested blood samples of mice at different ages, as well as brain samples from 17.5-month-old mice (roughly equivalent to a 50-year-old human).

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Hunting for a needle in a haystack: Scientists identify the gene that causes ARSACS

Written by Dr. Sriram Jayabal Edited by Dr. Brenda Toscano-Marquez

Scientists uncover SACS, a gene containing the largest exon identified in vertebrates, which leads to ARSACS when mutated.

What is your morning routine? Coffee first, right? Now, try to think of all the diverse movements you need to make to accomplish this routine. For instance, just to get a cup of coffee, you have to complete a sequence of motor tasks: you start by pulling the pot out of the machine, then you walk to the tap, fill the pot with water, walk back, pour the water into the machine, put your coffee in, and then finally turn on the machine.

needle in haystack
Picture courtesy of Pixabay

To perform any of these movements, your brain needs to communicate with dozens of muscles in your body. Unfortunately, in people who are affected by hereditary ataxias, the brain loses the ability to coordinate these precise movements. These diseases primarily affect the way patients walk (the symptom that defines “ataxia”), eventually forcing them to use a wheelchair for the rest of their lives.

Hereditary ataxias can be broadly classified as either dominant or recessive. Dominantly-inherited ataxias can be passed down even if only one of the parents is affected; therefore, the disease does not skip generations. Recessive ataxias are inherited from parents who are both carriers of the disease mutation (and who do not usually show any symptoms). Therefore, recessive ataxias can skip generations.

One such recessive ataxia is called Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). It was first discovered in people from the Charlevoix-Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec, Canada [1]. In this region, it is estimated that one out of every 22 individuals is a carrier for the disease mutation [2]. Though prevalent in this specific area of Canada, ARSACS has now been identified all across the world. Symptoms usually start in early childhood when toddlers are learning to walk. These children experience stiffness in the legs (spasticity) and incoordination in their gait (ataxia), leading them to fall more often. They also have difficulties writing, speaking, and performing tasks that require manual dexterity (usually actions that involve hand movements, like reaching for and grasping an object). They continue to experience worsening gait as they age, often needing a cane or handrail to move around by the time they reach adolescence. Around this time, many patients also experience retinal hypermyelination (an eye abnormality) and peripheral neuropathy (damage to the nerves throughout the body). By their thirties, they become dependent on a wheelchair. There is currently no cure for ARSACS, so it is imperative to study this disease’s underlying causes to identify effective treatments.

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Approaching the age of clinical therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

Written by Dr. Marija Cvetanovic Edited by Dr. Maxime W. Rousseaux

New research (published Nov. 2018) reveals promising potential genetic therapy for SCA1.

A research team comprised of scientists from academia and industry have tested a new treatment for Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), bringing disease-modifying therapy one step closer to the clinic. SCA1 is a dominantly-inherited ataxia that is currently untreatable. Symptoms of the disease include progressive loss of balance, slurring of speech, difficulties with swallowing and coughing, mild cognitive impairments, and depression. With a life expectancy after diagnosis of only 10-15 years, SCA1 is one of the fastest-progressing SCAs: after symptoms first appear, patients typically have just over a decade before these symptoms become so severe that they cause death (often due to respiratory failure). In 1993, collaborative efforts from the laboratories of Drs. Harry T. Orr and Huda Y. Zoghbi discovered that SCA1 is caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat somewhere in a patient’s DNA. CAG repeats cause a polyglutamine expansion in the protein that the mutated gene encodes; in this case, the group later identified that this had occurred in Ataxin-1 (ATXN1), the gene that encodes the ATXN1 protein. The SCA1 mouse models that Drs. Orr and Zoghbi generated (and graciously shared with the scientific community) have allowed for significant advances in the understanding of SCA1 pathogenesis over the years. Now, they provide preclinical evidence of a promising therapy to alter the progressive motor deficits and fatal outcome of SCA1.

stethoscope on top of laptop
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

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